Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 17, 2015
Previous Article Next Article

Synthetic chemistry with nitrous oxide

Author affiliations

Abstract

This review article summarizes efforts to use nitrous oxide (N2O, ‘laughing gas’) as a reagent in synthetic chemistry. The focus will be on reactions which are carried out in homogeneous solution under (relatively) mild conditions. First, the utilization of N2O as an oxidant is discussed. Due to the low intrinsic reactivity of N2O, selective oxidation reactions of highly reactive compounds are possible. Furthermore, it is shown that transition metal complexes can be used to catalyze oxidation reactions, in some cases with high turnover numbers. In the final part of this overview, the utilization of N2O as a building block for more complex molecules is discussed. It is shown that N2O can be used as an N-atom donor for the synthesis of interesting organic molecules such as triazenes and azo dyes.

Graphical abstract: Synthetic chemistry with nitrous oxide

Back to tab navigation

Article information


Submitted
24 Apr 2015
First published
24 Jun 2015

This article is Open Access

Chem. Soc. Rev., 2015,44, 6375-6386
Article type
Review Article
Author version available

Synthetic chemistry with nitrous oxide

K. Severin, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2015, 44, 6375
DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00339C

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Licence. Material from this article can be used in other publications provided that the correct acknowledgement is given with the reproduced material.

Reproduced material should be attributed as follows:

  • For reproduction of material from NJC:
    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and the RSC.
  • For reproduction of material from PCCP:
    [Original citation] - Published by the PCCP Owner Societies.
  • For reproduction of material from PPS:
    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the European Society for Photobiology, the European Photochemistry Association, and RSC.
  • For reproduction of material from all other RSC journals:
    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

Information about reproducing material from RSC articles with different licences is available on our Permission Requests page.


Social activity

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements