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Issue 4, 2014
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Visualizing cellular machines with colocalization single molecule microscopy

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Abstract

Many of the cell's macromolecular machines contain multiple components that transiently associate with one another. This compositional and dynamic complexity presents a challenge for understanding how these machines are constructed and function. Colocalization single molecule spectroscopy enables simultaneous observation of individual components of these machines in real-time and grants a unique window into processes that are typically obscured in ensemble assays. Colocalization experiments can yield valuable information about assembly pathways, compositional heterogeneity, and kinetics that together contribute to the development of richly detailed reaction mechanisms. This review focuses on recent advances in colocalization single molecule spectroscopy and how this technique has been applied to enhance our understanding of transcription, RNA splicing, and translation.

Graphical abstract: Visualizing cellular machines with colocalization single molecule microscopy

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Article information


Submitted
18 Jun 2013
First published
22 Aug 2013

Chem. Soc. Rev., 2014,43, 1189-1200
Article type
Review Article

Visualizing cellular machines with colocalization single molecule microscopy

J. D. Larson, M. L. Rodgers and A. A. Hoskins, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2014, 43, 1189
DOI: 10.1039/C3CS60208G

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