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Issue 21, 2020
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Impact of binding to the multidrug resistance regulator protein LmrR on the photo-physics and -chemistry of photosensitizers

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Abstract

Light activated photosensitizers generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that interfere with cellular components and can induce cell death, e.g., in photodynamic therapy (PDT). The effect of cellular components and especially proteins on the photochemistry and photophysics of the sensitizers is a key aspect in drug design and the correlating cellular response with the generation of specific ROS species. Here, we show the complex range of effects of binding of photosensitizer to a multidrug resistance protein, produced by bacteria, on the formers reactivity. We show that recruitment of drug like molecules by LmrR (Lactococcal multidrug resistance Regulator) modifies their photophysical properties and their capacity to induce oxidative stress especially in 1O2 generation, including rose bengal (RB), protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), bodipy, eosin Y (EY), riboflavin (RBF), and rhodamine 6G (Rh6G). The range of neutral and charged dyes with different exited redox potentials, are broadly representative of the dyes used in PDT.

Graphical abstract: Impact of binding to the multidrug resistance regulator protein LmrR on the photo-physics and -chemistry of photosensitizers

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Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
31 Mar 2020
Accepted
11 May 2020
First published
11 May 2020

This article is Open Access

Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020,22, 12228-12238
Article type
Paper

Impact of binding to the multidrug resistance regulator protein LmrR on the photo-physics and -chemistry of photosensitizers

S. H. Mejías, G. Roelfes and W. R. Browne, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 12228
DOI: 10.1039/D0CP01755H

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    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

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