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Issue 20, 2011
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Nanostructure and amphiphileself-assembly in polar molecular solvents: amides and the “solvophobic effect”

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Abstract

The ability of low molecular weight amides to support amphiphile self-assembly is shown to be a general feature for this class of solvents. This report extends the number of known polar solvents which can support amphiphile self-assembly by five new amides; more than doubling the number of known amides able to serve as amphiphile self-assembly media. The formation of lyotropic liquid crystalline phases by cationic and non-ionic surfactants in these liquid amides is reported. The ability of a solvent to promote amphiphile self-assembly is governed by the “solvophobic effect” and is linked to the solvent cohesiveness. The Gordon parameter which is a measure of the solvent cohesiveness was found to provide a guide to an amides capacity to support lyotropic liquid crystalline phase diversity and thermal stability ranges of those phases. The “solvophobic effect” and steric hindrance factors were compared between amide's and protic ionic liquids possessing analogous chemical structures and also being able to promote amphiphile self-assembly.

Graphical abstract: Nanostructure and amphiphile self-assembly in polar molecular solvents: amides and the “solvophobic effect”

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Article information


Submitted
23 Feb 2011
Accepted
08 Mar 2011
First published
05 Apr 2011

Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2011,13, 9180-9186
Article type
Paper

Nanostructure and amphiphile self-assembly in polar molecular solvents: amides and the “solvophobic effect”

T. L. Greaves, A. Weerawardena and C. J. Drummond, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2011, 13, 9180
DOI: 10.1039/C1CP20481E

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