Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 5, 2005
Previous Article Next Article

Reaction mechanisms for size-dependent H loss in Mg+(H2O)n: solvation controlled electron transfer

Author affiliations

Abstract

Mg+(H2O)n clusters ions are known to undergo a hydrogen loss reaction to produce (MgOH)+(H2O)n−1, when the cluster size n falls between 5 and 15. It indicates that the microscopic solvation environment has a strong effect on the reaction mechanisms, which have now been elucidated. Above n = 6, Mg+(H2O)n exists in the form of an ion pair, Mg2+(H2O)l⋯e(H2O)nl, and H+ is produced by the autoionization of H2O, enhanced by the hydrolysis of Mg2+. Production of the H atom is due to a reductive half reaction H+ + e → H, with the electron being the solvated electron in the ion pair. The reaction barrier is reduced when the electron is in the first or second solvation shell, promoting the H loss reaction. As the number of H2O molecules increases, the electron moves beyond the third solvation shell and the reaction barrier increases significantly, which is responsible for the subsequent switch-off of H loss. It has been one of the important goals in cluster sciences to understand the microscopic correlation between solvation and chemical reactivity by in-depth study on clusters, which has now been achieved in the case of Mg+(H2O)n, linking electron solvation with reaction paths for electron transfer.

Graphical abstract: Reaction mechanisms for size-dependent H loss in Mg+(H2O)n: solvation controlled electron transfer

Back to tab navigation

Publication details

The article was received on 14 Dec 2004, accepted on 18 Jan 2005 and first published on 10 Feb 2005


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/B418787N
Citation: Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2005,7, 1005-1013

  •   Request permissions

    Reaction mechanisms for size-dependent H loss in Mg+(H2O)n: solvation controlled electron transfer

    C. Siu and Z. Liu, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2005, 7, 1005
    DOI: 10.1039/B418787N

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements