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Issue 35, 2020, Issue in Progress
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Green and facile synthesis of water-soluble carbon dots from ethanolic shallot extract for chromium ion sensing in milk, fruit juices, and wastewater samples

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Abstract

Self-functionalized carbon dots (CDs) were prepared from ethanolic shallot extract to obtain a total phenolic precursor. The total phenolic extract was then heated at 180 °C for four hours in an autoclave. Only 1 mg L−1 of CDs had high fluorescence emission at 430 nm after excitation at 340 nm and manifested a high selectivity for Cr(VI) ions. The inter- and intra-day emission stability, pH, ionic strength, solvent effect, Stern–Volmer constant, incubation time, speciation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) ions, and ion selectivity of the as-prepared CDs were investigated in detail. The proposed method was validated in 20–100 μM linearity with y = 2.2346x as the set-zero intercept linear equation, 0.9981 as the correlation coefficient, 3.5 μM as the limit of detection (LOD), 11.7 μM as the limit of quantification (LOQ), and 2.78% and 5.29% as the intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviations (RSD), respectively. The recovery of drinking water, milk, soymilk, fruit juices (apple and coconut), tap water, and chromium-coated industrial waste water by the investigated Cr sensor was found to be 78.58–119.69%. Therefore, the proposed Cr(VI) sensor had superior advantages of sensitivity, selectivity, rapidity, and reproducibility.

Graphical abstract: Green and facile synthesis of water-soluble carbon dots from ethanolic shallot extract for chromium ion sensing in milk, fruit juices, and wastewater samples

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Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
06 Apr 2020
Accepted
25 May 2020
First published
29 May 2020

This article is Open Access

RSC Adv., 2020,10, 20638-20645
Article type
Paper

Green and facile synthesis of water-soluble carbon dots from ethanolic shallot extract for chromium ion sensing in milk, fruit juices, and wastewater samples

C. Sakaew, P. Sricharoen, N. Limchoowong, P. Nuengmatcha, C. Kukusamude, S. Kongsri and S. Chanthai, RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 20638
DOI: 10.1039/D0RA03101A

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