Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 10, 2020
Previous Article Next Article

Synthesis of anti-allergic drugs

Author affiliations

Abstract

Histamine is formed by the decarboxylation of histidine catalyzed by enzymes. It is an endogenous biologically active substance involved in multiple complex physiological processes as an important chemical transmitter. Histamine receptors have four subtypes, H1, H2, H3 and H4, all of which are G protein coupling receptors (GPCRs) with different physiological functions. Histamine plays an important role in the pathophysiological mechanism of allergic diseases, and the antagonistic effect of histamine has become an important way to study anti-allergic drugs, wherein the anti-allergic drugs used in clinical practice are mainly H1 receptor antagonists. Currently, there are many varieties of H1 receptor antagonists in clinical applications, which can be divided into ethylenediamine antagonists, amino ether antagonists, propylamine antagonists, tricyclic antagonists, piperazine antagonists and piperidine antagonists depending on their chemical structures. This article mainly reviews the research progress of allergic reactions with histamine H1 receptor antagonists and expounds the important aspects of the design and synthesis of various new compounds.

Graphical abstract: Synthesis of anti-allergic drugs

Back to tab navigation

Article information


Submitted
18 Dec 2019
Accepted
20 Jan 2020
First published
04 Feb 2020

This article is Open Access

RSC Adv., 2020,10, 5874-5885
Article type
Review Article

Synthesis of anti-allergic drugs

S. Zhou and G. Huang, RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 5874
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA10659F

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Licence. Material from this article can be used in other publications provided that the correct acknowledgement is given with the reproduced material.

Reproduced material should be attributed as follows:

  • For reproduction of material from NJC:
    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and the RSC.
  • For reproduction of material from PCCP:
    [Original citation] - Published by the PCCP Owner Societies.
  • For reproduction of material from PPS:
    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the European Society for Photobiology, the European Photochemistry Association, and RSC.
  • For reproduction of material from all other RSC journals:
    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

Information about reproducing material from RSC articles with different licences is available on our Permission Requests page.


Social activity

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements