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A synthetic chemist's guide to electroanalytical tools for studying reaction mechanisms

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Abstract

Monitoring reactive intermediates can provide vital information in the study of synthetic reaction mechanisms, enabling the design of new catalysts and methods. Many synthetic transformations are centred on the alteration of oxidation states, but these redox processes frequently pass through intermediates with short life-times, making their study challenging. A variety of electroanalytical tools can be utilised to investigate these redox-active intermediates: from voltammetry to in situ spectroelectrochemistry and scanning electrochemical microscopy. This perspective provides an overview of these tools, with examples of both electrochemically-initiated processes and monitoring redox-active intermediates formed chemically in solution. The article is designed to introduce synthetic organic and organometallic chemists to electroanalytical techniques and their use in probing key mechanistic questions.

Graphical abstract: A synthetic chemist's guide to electroanalytical tools for studying reaction mechanisms

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Publication details

The article was received on 29 Mar 2019, accepted on 23 May 2019 and first published on 23 May 2019


Article type: Perspective
DOI: 10.1039/C9SC01545K
Chem. Sci., 2019, Advance Article
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY-NC license
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    A synthetic chemist's guide to electroanalytical tools for studying reaction mechanisms

    C. Sandford, M. A. Edwards, K. J. Klunder, D. P. Hickey, M. Li, K. Barman, M. S. Sigman, H. S. White and S. D. Minteer, Chem. Sci., 2019, Advance Article , DOI: 10.1039/C9SC01545K

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