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Issue 18, 2019, Issue in Progress
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Effect of moderate magnetic fields on the surface tension of aqueous liquids: a reliable assessment

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Abstract

We precisely measure the effect of moderate magnetic field intensity on the surface tension of liquids, by placing pendant drops inside uniform fields where bulk forces due to gradients are eliminated. The surface tension of water is unaffected while that of paramagnetic salt solutions slightly decreases with increasing field strength.

Graphical abstract: Effect of moderate magnetic fields on the surface tension of aqueous liquids: a reliable assessment

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Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
31 Jan 2019
Accepted
23 Mar 2019
First published
29 Mar 2019

This article is Open Access

RSC Adv., 2019,9, 10030-10033
Article type
Paper

Effect of moderate magnetic fields on the surface tension of aqueous liquids: a reliable assessment

M. Hayakawa, J. Vialetto, M. Anyfantakis, M. Takinoue, S. Rudiuk, M. Morel and D. Baigl, RSC Adv., 2019, 9, 10030
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA00849G

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