Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 20, 2019
Previous Article Next Article

Contact lenses for continuous corneal temperature monitoring

Author affiliations

Abstract

Temperature variation is a ubiquitous medical sign to monitor ocular conditions including dry eye disease (DED), glaucoma, carotid artery stenosis, diabetic retinopathy, and vascular neuritis. The ability to measure OST in real time is desirable in point-of-care diagnostics. Here, we developed minimally invasive contact lens temperature sensors for continuous monitoring of the corneal temperature. The contact lens sensor consisted of a laser patterned commercial contact lens embedding temperature-sensitive Cholesteric Liquid Crystals (CLCs), which exhibited a fully reversible temperature-dependent color change in the visible spectrum. The contact lens allowed the corneal temperature to be mapped in four key areas, at distances of 0.0, 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0 mm from the pupil's edge. Liquid crystals exhibited a wavelength shift from 738 ± 4 nm to 474 ± 4 nm upon increasing the temperature from 29.0 °C to 40.0 °C, with a time responsivity of 490 ms and a negligible hysteresis. Readouts were performed using a smartphone, which output RGB triplets associated to temperature values. Contact lens sensors based on CLCs were fitted and tested on an ex vivo porcine eye and readouts were compared with infrared thermal measurements, resulting in an average difference of 0.3 °C.

Graphical abstract: Contact lenses for continuous corneal temperature monitoring

Back to tab navigation

Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
23 Jan 2019
Accepted
05 Apr 2019
First published
11 Apr 2019

This article is Open Access

RSC Adv., 2019,9, 11433-11442
Article type
Paper

Contact lenses for continuous corneal temperature monitoring

R. Moreddu, M. Elsherif, H. Butt, D. Vigolo and A. K. Yetisen, RSC Adv., 2019, 9, 11433
DOI: 10.1039/C9RA00601J

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported Licence. Material from this article can be used in other publications provided that the correct acknowledgement is given with the reproduced material and it is not used for commercial purposes.

Reproduced material should be attributed as follows:

  • For reproduction of material from NJC:
    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and the RSC.
  • For reproduction of material from PCCP:
    [Original citation] - Published by the PCCP Owner Societies.
  • For reproduction of material from PPS:
    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the European Society for Photobiology, the European Photochemistry Association, and RSC.
  • For reproduction of material from all other RSC journals:
    [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

Information about reproducing material from RSC articles with different licences is available on our Permission Requests page.


Social activity

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements