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Issue 42, 2018
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Bioceramic microneedle arrays are able to deliver OVA to dendritic cells in human skin

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Abstract

Microneedle-based vaccination into skin has several advantages over vaccination using conventional needles for intramuscular or subcutaneous injections. Microneedle (MN) arrays allow the vaccine to be delivered in a minimally invasive manner and directly into the skin, whereby the skin's superficial immune cells are not by-passed. Additionally, a systemic distribution of the vaccine may be avoided, which implies less side effects and less amount of vaccine needed. For a successful delivery, the needles need to penetrate the stratum corneum and reach the potent network of antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs). In this study, we evaluated patches covered with biodegradable ceramic (calcium sulphate) MNs with a tip diameter of approximately 3 μm and with two different lengths (300 and 600 μm) for their ability to penetrate and transfer the model allergen ovalbumin (OVA) into epidermis. MNs with a length of 600 μm (MN-600) and a volume average pore size of 12 ± 1 μm were more efficient in crossing the stratum corneum and to deliver OVA into CD1a+ DCs residing in the epidermis of human ex vivo skin, in comparison to MNs with a length of 300 μm. Quantitative in vitro release studies showed that approximately 90% of the loaded OVA could be released from MN-600 within 1 h. These findings support the further development of ceramic MNs for transcutaneous immunization.

Graphical abstract: Bioceramic microneedle arrays are able to deliver OVA to dendritic cells in human skin

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Publication details

The article was received on 05 Jun 2018, accepted on 13 Sep 2018 and first published on 11 Oct 2018


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C8TB01476K
Citation: J. Mater. Chem. B, 2018,6, 6808-6816
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY-NC license
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    Bioceramic microneedle arrays are able to deliver OVA to dendritic cells in human skin

    H. Vallhov, W. Xia, H. Engqvist and A. Scheynius, J. Mater. Chem. B, 2018, 6, 6808
    DOI: 10.1039/C8TB01476K

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