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Issue 37, 2018
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Controlled cavity collapse: scaling laws of drop formation

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Abstract

The formation of transient cavities at liquid interfaces occurs in an immense variety of natural processes, among which the bursting of surface bubbles and the impact of a drop on a liquid pool are salient. The collapse of a surface liquid cavity is a well documented natural process that leads to the ejection of a thin and fast jet. Droplets generated through this process can be one order of magnitude smaller than the cavity's aperture, and they are consequently of interest in drop on demand inkjet applications. In this work, the controlled formation and collapse of a liquid cavity is analyzed, and the conditions for minimizing the resulting size and number of ejected drops are determined. The experimental and numerical models are simple and consist of a liquid reservoir, a nozzle plate with the discharge orifice, and a moving piston actuated by single half-sine-shaped pull-mode pulses. The size of the jetted droplet is described by a physical model resulting in a scaling law that is numerically and experimentally validated.

Graphical abstract: Controlled cavity collapse: scaling laws of drop formation

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Publication details

The article was received on 15 Jan 2018, accepted on 29 Jul 2018 and first published on 03 Sep 2018


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C8SM00114F
Citation: Soft Matter, 2018,14, 7671-7679
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    Controlled cavity collapse: scaling laws of drop formation

    A. S. Ismail, A. M. Gañán-Calvo, J. R. Castrejón-Pita, M. A. Herrada and A. A. Castrejón-Pita, Soft Matter, 2018, 14, 7671
    DOI: 10.1039/C8SM00114F

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