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Issue 46, 2018
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Biomethanation of blast furnace gas using anaerobic granular sludge via addition of hydrogen

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Abstract

The high concentrations of CO (toxic) and CO2 (greenhouse gases) in blast furnace gas (a by-product of steelworks) reflect its low calorific value. In this study, anaerobic granular sludge was used to convert carbon from blast furnace gas to methane via exogenous hydrogen addition. The inhibition of methane production by CO partial pressure (PCO) was found to start from 0.4 atm. The intermediate metabolites from CO to methane including acetate, propionate, and H2 accumulated at higher CO concentrations in the presence of 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid. After the introduction of H2 and blast furnace gas, although the hydrogen partial pressure (PH2) up to 1.54 atm resulted in the maximum CH4 yield, the whole system was not stable due to the accumulation of a large amount of volatile fatty acids. The optimum PH2 on CH4 production from the simulated blast furnace gas, 5.32 mmol gāˆ’1 VSS, was determined at 0.88 atm in this study.

Graphical abstract: Biomethanation of blast furnace gas using anaerobic granular sludge via addition of hydrogen

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Publication details

The article was received on 06 Jun 2018, accepted on 17 Jul 2018 and first published on 24 Jul 2018


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C8RA04853C
Citation: RSC Adv., 2018,8, 26399-26406
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY-NC license
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    Biomethanation of blast furnace gas using anaerobic granular sludge via addition of hydrogen

    Y. Wang, C. Yin, Y. Liu, M. Tan, K. Shimizu, Z. Lei, Z. Zhang, I. Sumi, Y. Yao and Y. Mogi, RSC Adv., 2018, 8, 26399
    DOI: 10.1039/C8RA04853C

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