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Issue 15, 2018
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Electrochemical strategies for C–H functionalization and C–N bond formation

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Abstract

Conventional methods for carrying out carbon–hydrogen functionalization and carbon–nitrogen bond formation are typically conducted at elevated temperatures, and rely on expensive catalysts as well as the use of stoichiometric, and perhaps toxic, oxidants. In this regard, electrochemical synthesis has recently been recognized as a sustainable and scalable strategy for the construction of challenging carbon–carbon and carbon–heteroatom bonds. Here, electrosynthesis has proven to be an environmentally benign, highly effective and versatile platform for achieving a wide range of nonclassical bond disconnections via generation of radical intermediates under mild reaction conditions. This review provides an overview on the use of anodic electrochemical methods for expediting the development of carbon–hydrogen functionalization and carbon–nitrogen bond formation strategies. Emphasis is placed on methodology development and mechanistic insight and aims to provide inspiration for future synthetic applications in the field of electrosynthesis.

Graphical abstract: Electrochemical strategies for C–H functionalization and C–N bond formation

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Publication details

The article was received on 17 Mar 2018 and first published on 18 Jun 2018


Article type: Review Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7CS00619E
Citation: Chem. Soc. Rev., 2018,47, 5786-5865
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY license
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    Electrochemical strategies for C–H functionalization and C–N bond formation

    M. D. Kärkäs, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2018, 47, 5786
    DOI: 10.1039/C7CS00619E

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