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Issue 10, 2016
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Design principles of spectroscopic probes for biological applications

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Abstract

Spectroscopic (chromogenic, fluorescent, or chemiluminescent) probes have been widely used in many fields due to their high sensitivity and unrivaled spatiotemporal resolution. This area is an old one but always full of activity, because the rapid development of science and technology requires not only new probes for specific purposes (e.g., subcellular imaging) but also the update of current probes with more satisfactory properties. Based on our experiences and including existing knowledge, in this mini-review we briefly discuss the design strategies, response modes, and bioapplications of small molecular spectroscopic probes, in particular their advantages and disadvantages as well as possible research trends, which may be helpful to those who are interested in this continually growing research area.

Graphical abstract: Design principles of spectroscopic probes for biological applications

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Publication details

The article was received on 07 Jun 2016, accepted on 10 Jul 2016 and first published on 11 Jul 2016


Article type: Minireview
DOI: 10.1039/C6SC02500E
Citation: Chem. Sci., 2016,7, 6309-6315
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY-NC license
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    Design principles of spectroscopic probes for biological applications

    J. Zhou and H. Ma, Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 6309
    DOI: 10.1039/C6SC02500E

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      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

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