Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 4, 2016
Previous Article Next Article

Can slow-moving ions explain hysteresis in the current–voltage curves of perovskite solar cells?

Author affiliations

Abstract

The hypothesis that ion motion is responsible for anomalous hysteresis in the current–voltage curves of perovskite solar cells is investigated through a combination of electrical transport modelling and experimental measurements. In a combined computational and experimental study, good agreement is obtained between experiment and the results of a charge transport model covering mixed ionic-electronic conduction. Our model couples electrons, holes and defect mediated ion motion suggesting that slow moving ions are indeed the origin of the hysteresis. The magnitude of the ion diffusion coefficient required to match experiment and theory, ∼10−12 cm2 s−1, depends on the cell, but is similar to that predicted by microscopic theory of vacancy mediated diffusion. The investigation is extended to preconditioning procedures which are known to substantially influence the hysteresis. The method developed for solving the stiff equations in the drift diffusion model is widely applicable to other double layer problems occurring in electrochemical applications such as the evolution of transmembrane potentials in living cells.

Graphical abstract: Can slow-moving ions explain hysteresis in the current–voltage curves of perovskite solar cells?

Back to tab navigation

Supplementary files

Publication details

The article was received on 05 Sep 2015, accepted on 12 Feb 2016 and first published on 12 Feb 2016


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C5EE02740C
Author version
available:
Download author version (PDF)
Citation: Energy Environ. Sci., 2016,9, 1476-1485
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY license
  •   Request permissions

    Can slow-moving ions explain hysteresis in the current–voltage curves of perovskite solar cells?

    G. Richardson, S. E. J. O'Kane, R. G. Niemann, T. A. Peltola, J. M. Foster, P. J. Cameron and A. B. Walker, Energy Environ. Sci., 2016, 9, 1476
    DOI: 10.1039/C5EE02740C

    This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Licence. Material from this article can be used in other publications provided that the correct acknowledgement is given with the reproduced material.

    Reproduced material should be attributed as follows:

    • For reproduction of material from NJC:
      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and the RSC.
    • For reproduction of material from PCCP:
      [Original citation] - Published by the PCCP Owner Societies.
    • For reproduction of material from PPS:
      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the European Society for Photobiology, the European Photochemistry Association, and RSC.
    • For reproduction of material from all other RSC journals:
      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

    Information about reproducing material from RSC articles with different licences is available on our Permission Requests page.

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements