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Issue 1, 2016
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A proteomic approach for the rapid, multi-informative and reliable identification of blood

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Abstract

Blood evidence is frequently encountered at the scene of violent crimes and can provide valuable intelligence in the forensic investigation of serious offences. Because many of the current enhancement methods used by crime scene investigators are presumptive, the visualisation of blood is not always reliable nor does it bear additional information. In the work presented here, two methods employing a shotgun bottom up proteomic approach for the detection of blood are reported; the developed protocols employ both an in solution digestion method and a recently proposed procedure involving immobilization of trypsin on hydrophobin Vmh2 coated MALDI sample plate. The methods are complementary as whilst one yields more identifiable proteins (as biomolecular signatures), the other is extremely rapid (5 minutes). Additionally, data demonstrate the opportunity to discriminate blood provenance even when two different blood sources are present in a mixture. This approach is also suitable for old bloodstains which had been previously chemically enhanced, as experiments conducted on a 9-year-old bloodstain deposited on a ceramic tile demonstrate.

Graphical abstract: A proteomic approach for the rapid, multi-informative and reliable identification of blood

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Supplementary files

Article information


Submitted
30 Sep 2015
Accepted
17 Nov 2015
First published
24 Nov 2015

This article is Open Access

Analyst, 2016,141, 191-198
Article type
Paper
Author version available

A proteomic approach for the rapid, multi-informative and reliable identification of blood

E. Patel, P. Cicatiello, L. Deininger, M. R. Clench, G. Marino, P. Giardina, G. Langenburg, A. West, P. Marshall, V. Sears and S. Francese, Analyst, 2016, 141, 191 DOI: 10.1039/C5AN02016F

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Licence. You can use material from this article in other publications without requesting further permissions from the RSC, provided that the correct acknowledgement is given.

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