Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 12, 2015
Previous Article Next Article

Engineering chemically modified viruses for prostate cancer cell recognition

Author affiliations

Abstract

Specific detection of circulating tumor cells and characterization of their aggressiveness could improve cancer diagnostics and treatment. Metastasis results from such tumor cells, and causes the majority of cancer deaths. Chemically modified viruses could provide an inexpensive and efficient approach to detect tumor cells and quantitate their cell surface biomarkers. However, non-specific adhesion between the cell surface receptors and the virus surface presents a challenge. This report describes wrapping the virus surface with different PEG architectures, including as fusions to oligolysine, linkers, spacers and scaffolded ligands. The reported PEG wrappers can reduce by >75% the non-specific adhesion of phage to cell surfaces. Dynamic light scattering verified the non-covalent attachment by the reported wrappers as increased sizes of the virus particles. Further modifications resulted in specific detection of prostate cancer cells expressing PSMA, a key prostate cancer biomarker. The approach allowed quantification of PSMA levels on the cell surface, and could distinguish more aggressive forms of the disease.

Graphical abstract: Engineering chemically modified viruses for prostate cancer cell recognition

Back to tab navigation

Supplementary files

Publication details

The article was received on 30 Jul 2015, accepted on 07 Oct 2015 and first published on 07 Oct 2015


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C5MB00511F
Author version
available:
Download author version (PDF)
Citation: Mol. BioSyst., 2015,11, 3264-3272
  •   Request permissions

    Engineering chemically modified viruses for prostate cancer cell recognition

    K. Mohan and G. A. Weiss, Mol. BioSyst., 2015, 11, 3264
    DOI: 10.1039/C5MB00511F

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements