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Issue 14, 2015
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Tailoring three-dimensional architectures by rolled-up nanotechnology for mimicking microvasculatures

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Abstract

Artificial microvasculature, particularly as part of the blood–brain barrier, has a high benefit for pharmacological drug discovery and uptake regulation. We demonstrate the fabrication of tubular structures with patterns of holes, which are capable of mimicking microvasculatures. By using photolithography, the dimensions of the cylindrical scaffolds can be precisely tuned as well as the alignment and size of holes. Overlapping holes can be tailored to create diverse three-dimensional configurations, for example, periodic nanoscaled apertures. The porous tubes, which can be made from diverse materials for differential functionalization, are biocompatible and can be modified to be biodegradable in the culture medium. As a proof of concept, endothelial cells (ECs) as well as astrocytes were cultured on these scaffolds. They form monolayers along the scaffolds, are guided by the array of holes and express tight junctions. Nanoscaled filaments of cells on these scaffolds were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). This work provides the basic concept mainly for an in vitro model of microvasculature which could also be possibly implanted in vivo due to its biodegradability.

Graphical abstract: Tailoring three-dimensional architectures by rolled-up nanotechnology for mimicking microvasculatures

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Publication details

The article was received on 07 Jan 2015, accepted on 16 May 2015 and first published on 18 May 2015


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C5LC00024F
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Citation: Lab Chip, 2015,15, 2981-2989
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY-NC license
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    Tailoring three-dimensional architectures by rolled-up nanotechnology for mimicking microvasculatures

    R. Arayanarakool, A. K. Meyer, L. Helbig, S. Sanchez and O. G. Schmidt, Lab Chip, 2015, 15, 2981
    DOI: 10.1039/C5LC00024F

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