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Issue 5, 2015
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C-peptide and zinc delivery to erythrocytes requires the presence of albumin: implications in diabetes explored with a 3D-printed fluidic device

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Abstract

People with type 1 diabetes (T1D) must administer insulin exogenously due to the destruction of their pancreatic β-cells. Endogenous insulin is stored in β-cell granules along with C-peptide, a 31 amino acid peptide that is secreted from these granules in amounts equal to insulin. Exogenous co-administration of C-peptide with insulin has proven to reduce diabetes-associated complications in animals and humans. The exact mechanism of C-peptide's beneficial effects after secretion from the β-cell granules is not completely understood, thus hindering its development as an exogenously administered hormone. Monitoring tissue-to-tissue communication using a 3D-printed microfluidic device revealed that zinc and C-peptide are being delivered to erythrocytes by albumin. Upon delivery, erythrocyte-derived ATP increased by >50%, as did endothelium-derived NO, which was measured downstream in the 3D-printed device. Our results suggest that hormone replacement therapy in diabetes may be improved by exogenous administration of a C-peptide ensemble that includes zinc and albumin.

Graphical abstract: C-peptide and zinc delivery to erythrocytes requires the presence of albumin: implications in diabetes explored with a 3D-printed fluidic device

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Publication details

The article was received on 21 Oct 2014, accepted on 18 Mar 2015 and first published on 19 Mar 2015


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C4IB00243A
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Integr. Biol., 2015,7, 534-543

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