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Issue 36, 2014
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Influence of interfacial rheology on drainage from curved surfaces

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Abstract

Thin lubrication flows accompanying drainage from curved surfaces surround us (e.g., the drainage of the tear film on our eyes). These draining aqueous layers are normally covered with surface-active molecules that render the free surface viscoelastic. The non-Newtonian character of these surfaces fundamentally alters the dynamics of drainage. We show that increased film stability during drainage can occur as a consequence of enhanced surface rheology. Increasing the surfactant layer viscosity decreases the rate of drainage; however, this retarding influence is most pronounced when the insoluble surfactant layer has significant elasticity. We also present a simple theoretical model that offers qualitative support to our experimental findings.

Graphical abstract: Influence of interfacial rheology on drainage from curved surfaces

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Article information


Submitted
20 Nov 2013
Accepted
11 Feb 2014
First published
11 Feb 2014

This article is Open Access

Soft Matter, 2014,10, 6917-6925
Article type
Paper

Influence of interfacial rheology on drainage from curved surfaces

M. S. Bhamla, C. E. Giacomin, C. Balemans and G. G. Fuller, Soft Matter, 2014, 10, 6917
DOI: 10.1039/C3SM52934G

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