Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 4, 2014
Previous Article Next Article

Manganese leads to an increase in markers of oxidative stress as well as to a shift in the ratio of Fe(ii)/(iii) in rat brain tissue

Author affiliations

Abstract

Occupationally or environmentally caused chronic exposure to Manganese (Mn) can lead to a degeneration of dopaminergic neurons inducing a Parkinson-like complaint called manganism. Deciphering the ongoing neurodegenerative mechanisms in the affected brain is still a major task for understanding the complex modes of action. Therefore, we applied a non-toxic, oral feeding in rats simulating a chronic exposure to Mn. Analysis of brain extracts by electrospray ionization Fourier transform resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FT-ICR-MS) revealed an increase in markers of oxidative stress like glutathione disulfide (GSSG), prostaglandins, and 15(S)-HETE, a marker of lipid peroxidation. Furthermore, acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity and glutamate concentrations were elevated in brain samples of Mn-supplemented rats, suggesting oxidative stress in the brain tissue. Application of ion chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (IC-ICP-OES) further showed a shift of Fe(III) towards Fe(II) in the brain samples enabling for example the action of the Fenton reaction. This is the first time that changes in the Fe-species distribution could be related to Mn-induced neuroinflammation and is therefore enlarging the knowledge of this complex neurodegenerative condition. The combination of our findings provides substantial evidence that Mn-induced neuroinflammation leads to oxidative stress triggered by multifactorial pathophysiological processes.

Graphical abstract: Manganese leads to an increase in markers of oxidative stress as well as to a shift in the ratio of Fe(ii)/(iii) in rat brain tissue

Back to tab navigation

Publication details

The article was received on 23 Jan 2014, accepted on 17 Feb 2014 and first published on 17 Feb 2014


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C4MT00022F
Metallomics, 2014,6, 921-931
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY license
  •   Request permissions

    Manganese leads to an increase in markers of oxidative stress as well as to a shift in the ratio of Fe(II)/(III) in rat brain tissue

    K. Fernsebner, J. Zorn, B. Kanawati, A. Walker and B. Michalke, Metallomics, 2014, 6, 921
    DOI: 10.1039/C4MT00022F

    This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Licence. Material from this article can be used in other publications provided that the correct acknowledgement is given with the reproduced material.

    Reproduced material should be attributed as follows:

    • For reproduction of material from NJC:
      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and the RSC.
    • For reproduction of material from PCCP:
      [Original citation] - Published by the PCCP Owner Societies.
    • For reproduction of material from PPS:
      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the European Society for Photobiology, the European Photochemistry Association, and RSC.
    • For reproduction of material from all other RSC journals:
      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

    Information about reproducing material from RSC articles with different licences is available on our Permission Requests page.

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements