Jump to main content
Jump to site search
Access to RSC content Close the message box

Continue to access RSC content when you are not at your institution. Follow our step-by-step guide.


Issue 38, 2013
Previous Article Next Article

Does decreasing ion–ion association improve cation mobility in single ion conductors?

Author affiliations

Abstract

We report on poly(ethylene oxide) based single ion conductors for solid polymer electrolytes. The widely agreed upon vehicle for cation movement in PEO-based solid polymer electrolytes is the single cation, in which the cation is solvated by PEO ether oxygens. Here we report a different vehicle that becomes active with strong anion–cation interactions. In the common perspective, increasing ion–ion interactions would increase ion association, decrease cation solvation, and disable cation movement. Decreasing these interactions would have the opposite effect. We vary cation–anion interaction strength, using anion charge delocalization in molecular dynamics simulations. This creates a series of systems with levels of ion aggregation from single cations (weak interaction) to mostly ion aggregates (strong interaction). Although in the weak model single cations are faster than those in ion pairs and aggregates, with stronger interactions a different mechanism emerges. Paired cations move the fastest by visiting different anion partners in succession. The importance of this observation lies in the possibility of decoupling cation movement from polymer motion, which is required to prevent dendrite formation in both Li and Na ion batteries.

Graphical abstract: Does decreasing ion–ion association improve cation mobility in single ion conductors?

Back to tab navigation

Article information


Submitted
18 Apr 2013
Accepted
29 Jul 2013
First published
05 Aug 2013

Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2013,15, 16143-16151
Article type
Paper

Does decreasing ion–ion association improve cation mobility in single ion conductors?

K. Lin and J. K. Maranas, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2013, 15, 16143
DOI: 10.1039/C3CP51661J

Social activity

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements