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Issue 1, 2012
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UVA and endogenous photosensitizers – the detection of singlet oxygen by its luminescence

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Abstract

UVA irradiation (320–400 nm) comprises about 95 percent of incident midday solar ultraviolet irradiation. It penetrates skin much deeper than UVB irradiation. The absorption of UVA irradiation in endogenous chromophores frequently leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species such as singlet oxygen (1O2). 1O2 is an important biochemical intermediate in multiple biological processes. Beside other procedures, the direct detection of 1O2 by its luminescence is a powerful tool that helps to understand the generation of 1O2 during UVA exposure in solution, in vitro and in vivo. This article describes the endogenous photosensitizers, their ability to generate 1O2 under UVA irradiation, and the detection technology to visualize the action of 1O2.

Graphical abstract: UVA and endogenous photosensitizers – the detection of singlet oxygen by its luminescence

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Publication details

The article was received on 12 May 2011, accepted on 26 Aug 2011 and first published on 11 Oct 2011


Article type: Perspective
DOI: 10.1039/C1PP05142C
Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2012,11, 107-117

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    UVA and endogenous photosensitizers – the detection of singlet oxygen by its luminescence

    W. Bäumler, J. Regensburger, A. Knak, A. Felgenträger and T. Maisch, Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2012, 11, 107
    DOI: 10.1039/C1PP05142C

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