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Issue 13, 2011
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Ultrasensitive fluorescence-based methods for nucleic acid detection: towards amplification-free genetic analysis

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Abstract

Real time PCR is the mainstay of current nucleic acid assays, underpinning applications in forensic science, point-of-care diagnostics and detection of bioterrorism agents. Despite its broad utility, the search for new tests continues, inspired by second and third generation DNA sequencing technologies and fuelled by progress in single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, nanotechnology and microfabrication. These new methods promise the direct detection of nucleic acids without the need for enzymatic amplification. In this feature article, we provide a chemist's perspective on this multidisciplinary area, introducing the concepts of single molecule detection then focussing on the selection of labels and probe chemistry suitable for generating a signal detectable by ultrasensitive fluorescence spectroscopy. Finally, we discuss the further developments that are required to incorporate these detection platforms into integrated ‘sample-in-answer-out’ instruments, capable of detecting many target sequences in a matter of minutes.

Graphical abstract: Ultrasensitive fluorescence-based methods for nucleic acid detection: towards amplification-free genetic analysis

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Publication details

The article was received on 04 Oct 2010, accepted on 05 Jan 2011 and first published on 31 Jan 2011


Article type: Feature Article
DOI: 10.1039/C0CC04215C
Citation: Chem. Commun., 2011,47, 3717-3735
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    Ultrasensitive fluorescence-based methods for nucleic acid detection: towards amplification-free genetic analysis

    R. T. Ranasinghe and T. Brown, Chem. Commun., 2011, 47, 3717
    DOI: 10.1039/C0CC04215C

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