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Issue 14, 2010
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Creation of cavitation activity in a microfluidic device through acoustically driven capillary waves

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Abstract

We present a study on achieving intense acoustic cavitation generated by ultrasonic vibrations in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based microfluidic devices. The substrate to which the PDMS is bonded was forced into oscillation with a simple piezoelectric transducer attached at 5 mm from the device to a microscopic glass slide. The transducer was operated at 100 kHz with driving voltages ranging between 20 V and 230 V. Close to the glass surface, pressure and vibration amplitudes of up to 20 bar and 400 nm were measured respectively. It is found that this strong forcing leads to the excitation of nonlinear surface waves when gas–liquid interfaces are present in the microfluidic channels. Also, it is observed that nuclei leading to intense inertial cavitation are generated by the entrapment of gas pockets at those interfaces. Subsequently, cavitation bubble clusters with void fractions of more than 50% are recorded with high-speed photography at up to 250 000 frames/s. The cavitation clusters can be sustained through the continuous injection of gas using a T-junction in the microfluidic device.

Graphical abstract: Creation of cavitation activity in a microfluidic device through acoustically driven capillary waves

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Publication details

The article was received on 03 Feb 2010, accepted on 06 Apr 2010 and first published on 07 May 2010


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C002363A
Citation: Lab Chip, 2010,10, 1848-1855
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    Creation of cavitation activity in a microfluidic device through acoustically driven capillary waves

    Tandiono, S. Ohl, D. S. Ow, E. Klaseboer, V. V. T. Wong, A. Camattari and C. Ohl, Lab Chip, 2010, 10, 1848
    DOI: 10.1039/C002363A

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