Jump to main content
Jump to site search
Access to RSC content Close the message box

Continue to access RSC content when you are not at your institution. Follow our step-by-step guide.


Issue 7, 2009
Previous Article Next Article

Engineering and exploiting protein assemblies in synthetic biology

Author affiliations

Abstract

Many biologically relevant structures are formed by the self-assembly of identical protein units. Examples include virus capsids or cytoskeleton components. Synthetic biology can harness these bottom-up assemblies and expand their scope for applications in cell biology and biomedicine. Nanobiotechnology and materials science also stand to gain from assemblies with unique nanoscale periodicity. In these disciplines, the soft scaffolds can serve as templates to produce new metallic or inorganic materialsof predefined dimensions. This review article describes how the structure and function of biological assemblies has inspired researchers to develop engineered systems with designed properties for new biomolecular applications.

Graphical abstract: Engineering and exploiting protein assemblies in synthetic biology

Back to tab navigation

Article information


Submitted
05 Feb 2009
Accepted
11 Mar 2009
First published
07 May 2009

Mol. BioSyst., 2009,5, 723-732
Article type
Review Article

Engineering and exploiting protein assemblies in synthetic biology

D. Papapostolou and S. Howorka, Mol. BioSyst., 2009, 5, 723
DOI: 10.1039/B902440A

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements