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Issue 11, 2006
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Artificial nanomachines based on interlocked molecular species: recent advances

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Abstract

The bottom-up construction and operation of nanoscale machines and motors, that is, supramolecular systems wherein the molecular components can be set in motion in a controlled manner for ultimately accomplishing a function, is a topic of great interest in nanoscience and a fascinating challenge of nanotechnology. The field of artificial molecular machines and motors is growing at an astonishing rate and is attracting a great deal of interest. Research in the last decade has shown that species made of interlocked molecular components like rotaxanes, catenanes and related systems are most attractive candidates. In recent times, the evolution of the structural and functional design of such systems has led to the construction and operation of complex molecular machines that, in some cases, are able to do specific tasks.

This tutorial review is intended to discuss the design principles for nanomachines based on interlocked molecules, and to provide a timely overview on representative prototype systems.

Graphical abstract: Artificial nanomachines based on interlocked molecular species: recent advances

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Article information


Submitted
14 Jun 2006
First published
06 Sep 2006

Chem. Soc. Rev., 2006,35, 1135-1149
Article type
Tutorial Review

Artificial nanomachines based on interlocked molecular species: recent advances

V. Balzani, A. Credi, S. Silvi and M. Venturi, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2006, 35, 1135
DOI: 10.1039/B517102B

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