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Issue 5, 2006
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Sulfur and iron in shipwrecks cause conservation concerns

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Abstract

Synchrotron-based sulfur X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals considerable accumulation of organosulfur (e.g. thiols), pyrite and iron(II) sulfides in marine-archaeological wood preserved in seawater, e.g. for historical shipwrecks such as the Vasa and Mary Rose. In the museum, oxidation of the sulfur compounds in the presence of iron ions may cause severe acidity in the moist wood. This tutorial review discusses developments of conservation methods to remove acid and iron, and how to analyse and stabilise sulfur compounds in the wood.

Graphical abstract: Sulfur and iron in shipwrecks cause conservation concerns

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Article information


Submitted
27 Dec 2005
First published
13 Feb 2006

Chem. Soc. Rev., 2006,35, 399-415
Article type
Tutorial Review

Sulfur and iron in shipwrecks cause conservation concerns

Y. Fors and M. Sandström, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2006, 35, 399
DOI: 10.1039/B507010B

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