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Hydrogels in Cell-Based Therapies Editors: Che J Connon, Ian W Hamley



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This book contains 238 pages.
Print publication date: 18 Mar 2014
Copyright year: 2014
Print ISBN: 978-1-84973-798-2
PDF eISBN: 978-1-78262-205-5
ePub eISBN: 978-1-78262-126-3
Citation:

About this book

Hydrogels are attractive materials for uses in regenerative medicine due to their biocompatibility and high water absorbance and retention properties. Applications are emerging in stem cell niches, biopolymers and synthetic polymers for tissue scaffolding, wound healing and hydrogels for cellular diagnostics and delivery.

Hydrogels in Cell-Based Therapies looks at the use of different polymers and other bionanomaterials to fabricate different hydrogel systems and their biomedical applications including enzyme responsive hydrogels and biomaterials, thermally responsive hydrogels, collagen gels and alginates.

With complementary expertise in cell biology and soft materials, the Editors provide a comprehensive overview of recent updates in this highly topical field. This highly interdisciplinary subject will appeal to researchers in cell biology, biochemistry, biomaterials and polymer science and those interested in hydrogel applications.

From the book series:
Soft Matter Series

Author information

Ian W. Hamley is Diamond Professor of Physical Chemistry at the University of Reading, UK and holds a Royal Society-Wolfson Research Merit Award. He has previously authored three books on soft matter and block copolymers and edited two texts. His research interests are focussed on soft materials including polymers, colloids and biomaterials.

Che Connon is Reader in Tissue Engineering and Cell Therapy. His research focus is primarily in the area of corneal tissue engineering, seeking to engineer functional replacement and temporary 'bridge' tissues while also developing model systems to study physiological and pathophysiological corneal tissue formation.