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Evaluating the resilience of superhydrophobic materials using the slip-length concept

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Abstract

The drive to introduce superhydrophobic materials into real-world applications requires the development of robust and effective surfaces. Efforts to formulate a collective understanding of the design approaches required to engineer resilience are hindered significantly by inconsistencies in the evaluation methods used throughout the literature. Herein, we report a technique that accurately quantifies both the superhydrophobicity, and superhydrophobic resilience under fluid shear stress, using slip-length measurements. Two types of superhydrophobic surface are used (micro-rough PTFE, and nano/micro-rough nanoparticle coatings), in order to demonstrate the different mechanisms of superhydrophobic degradation, in addition to the versatility of the slip-length technique to study the phenomena. The shear stress testing is symptomatic of real-world conditions (applied fluid stress), an environment where superhydrophobic materials are relatively vulnerable due to their comparative fragility. The technique is both a comprehensive, sensitive and quantitatively reproducible, assessment method of superhydrophobic interfaces, which if widely adopted, would accelerate progress in this area.

Graphical abstract: Evaluating the resilience of superhydrophobic materials using the slip-length concept

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Publication details

The article was received on 29 Nov 2017, accepted on 13 Feb 2018 and first published on 15 Feb 2018


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C7TA10510J
Citation: J. Mater. Chem. A, 2018, Advance Article
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    Evaluating the resilience of superhydrophobic materials using the slip-length concept

    H. Xu, C. R. Crick and R. J. Poole, J. Mater. Chem. A, 2018, Advance Article , DOI: 10.1039/C7TA10510J

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