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Issue 4, 2018
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Bioluminescent probe for detecting endogenous hypochlorite in living mice

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Abstract

As a kind of biologically important reactive oxygen species (ROS), hypochlorite (ClO) plays a crucial role in many physiological processes. As such, endogenous ClO is a powerful antibacterial agent during pathogen invasion. Nonetheless, excessive endogenous ClO could pose a health threat to mammalian animals including humans. However, the detection of endogenous ClO by bioluminescence probes in vivo remains a considerable challenge. Herein, based on a caged strategy, we developed a turn-on bioluminescent probe 1 for the highly selective detection of ClOin vitro and imaging endogenous ClO in a mouse inflammation model. We anticipate that such a probe could help us understand the role of endogenous ClO in a variety of physiological and pathological processes.

Graphical abstract: Bioluminescent probe for detecting endogenous hypochlorite in living mice

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Publication details

The article was received on 20 Nov 2017, accepted on 19 Dec 2017 and first published on 19 Dec 2017


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C7OB02842C
Citation: Org. Biomol. Chem., 2018,16, 645-651
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    Bioluminescent probe for detecting endogenous hypochlorite in living mice

    C. Tang, Y. Gao, T. Liu, Y. Lin, X. Zhang, C. Zhang, X. Li, T. Zhang, L. Du and M. Li, Org. Biomol. Chem., 2018, 16, 645
    DOI: 10.1039/C7OB02842C

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