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Polymer Brushes Inside Solid State Nanopores Form an Impenetrable Entropic Barrier for Proteins

Abstract

Polymer brushes are widely used to prevent adsorption of proteins, but the mechanisms by which they operate remain heavily debated since many decades. We show conclusive evidence that a polymer brush can be a remarkably strong kinetic barrier towards proteins by using poly(ethylene glycol) grafted to the sidewalls of pores in 30 nm thin gold films. Despite consisting of about 90% water, the free coils seal apertures up to 100 nm entirely with respect to serum protein translocation, as monitored label-free through the plasmonic activity of the nanopores. Conclusions are further supported by atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy. A theoretical model indicates that the brush undergoes a morphology transition to a sealing state when the ratio between extension and radius of curvature is approximately 0.8. The brush-sealed pores represent a new type of ultrathin filters with potential applications in bioanalytical systems.

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Publication details

The article was received on 18 Dec 2017, accepted on 06 Feb 2018 and first published on 06 Feb 2018


Article type: Communication
DOI: 10.1039/C7NR09432A
Citation: Nanoscale, 2018, Accepted Manuscript
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    Polymer Brushes Inside Solid State Nanopores Form an Impenetrable Entropic Barrier for Proteins

    G. Emilsson, K. Xiong, Y. Sakiyama, B. Malekian, V. Ahlberg Gagner, R. Schoch, R. Lim and A. Dahlin, Nanoscale, 2018, Accepted Manuscript , DOI: 10.1039/C7NR09432A

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