Jump to main content
Jump to site search


Structure and properties of dynamic metal–organic frameworks: a brief accounts of crystalline-to-crystalline and crystalline-to-amorphous transformations

Author affiliations

Abstract

In the last decade, dynamic metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) have been under the intense scrutiny of chemical researchers for their potential applications in many interesting fields. Due to the flexibility in the structure, this class of materials can recognize or respond towards a signal by changing their structural architecture as well as their physiochemical properties. Therefore dynamic MOFs can be considered as “smart materials” for their use in many future technologies. All the transformations of a dynamic MOF occur through solid-state structural changes, hence these dynamicity driven materials sometimes have unique structures that cannot be derived by conventional synthetic methods. So far, a mammoth study has been performed about the synthetic procedures and applications of dynamic metal–organic frameworks. The stimuli response, which is the most important parameter in the dynamism of such structures, has also been elaborately discussed. Most of the previous review works in this area have covered the structure-stimuli-application flowchart, but in this highlight we discuss the point-to-point structural changes with an aim to understand the dynamicity pathway process of MOFs. Some associated changes in their properties, precisely, after and before structural changes, are also covered.

Graphical abstract: Structure and properties of dynamic metal–organic frameworks: a brief accounts of crystalline-to-crystalline and crystalline-to-amorphous transformations

Back to tab navigation

Publication details

The article was received on 01 Dec 2017, accepted on 19 Jan 2018 and first published on 19 Jan 2018


Article type: Highlight
DOI: 10.1039/C7CE02066J
Citation: CrystEngComm, 2018, Advance Article
  •   Request permissions

    Structure and properties of dynamic metal–organic frameworks: a brief accounts of crystalline-to-crystalline and crystalline-to-amorphous transformations

    A. Halder and D. Ghoshal, CrystEngComm, 2018, Advance Article , DOI: 10.1039/C7CE02066J

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements