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Bright and sensitive ratiometric fluorescent probe enabling endogenous FA imaging and mechanistic exploration of indirect oxidative damage due to FA in various living systems

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Abstract

As a notorious toxin, formaldehyde (FA) poses an immense threat to human health. Aberrantly elevated FA levels lead to serious pathologies, including organ damage, neurodegeneration, and cancer. Unfortunately, current techniques limit FA imaging to general comparative studies, instead of a mechanistic exploration of its biological role, and this is presumably due to the lack of robust molecular tools for reporting FA in living systems. More importantly, despite being reductive, FA, however, can induce oxidative damage to organisms, thus providing a challenge to the mechanistic study of FA using fluorescence imaging. Herein, we presented the design and multi-application of a bright sensitive ratiometric fluorescent probe 1-(4-(1H-phenanthro[9,10-d]imidazol-2-yl)phenyl) but-3-en-1-amine (PIPBA). With a π-extended phenylphenanthroimidazole fluorophore and an allylamine group, PIPBA exhibited high quantum yield (ϕ = 0.62) in blue fluorescent emission and selective reactivity toward FA. When sensing FA, PIPBA transformed to PIBE, which is a product capable of releasing bright green fluorescence (ϕ = 0.51) with its enhanced intramolecular charge transfer (ICT). Transformation of PIPBA to PIBE contributed to 80 nm of red shift in emission wavelength and a highly sensitive ratiometric response (92.2-fold), as well as a quite low detection limit (0.84 μM). PIPBA was successfully applied to various living systems, realizing, for the first time, ratiometric quantification (in cells), in vivo imaging (zebrafish), and living tissue imaging (vivisectional mouse under anaesthetic) of endogenous FA that was spontaneously generated by biological systems. Furthermore, with the aid of PIPBA, we obtained visual evidence for the oxidative damage of FA in both HeLa cells and renal tissue of a living mouse. The results demonstrated that FA exerted indirect oxidative damage by interacting with free radicals, thus producing more oxidizing species, which eventually caused aggravated oxidative damage to the organism. The indirect oxidative damage due to FA could be alleviated by an exogenous or endogenous antioxidant. The excellent behaviors of PIPBA demonstrate that a chemical probe can detect endogenous FA in cells/tissue/vivo, promising to be an effective tool for further exploration of the biological mechanism of FA in living systems.

Graphical abstract: Bright and sensitive ratiometric fluorescent probe enabling endogenous FA imaging and mechanistic exploration of indirect oxidative damage due to FA in various living systems

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Publication details

The article was received on 25 Aug 2017, accepted on 13 Sep 2017 and first published on 22 Sep 2017


Article type: Edge Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7SC03719H
Citation: Chem. Sci., 2017, Advance Article
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY-NC license
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    Bright and sensitive ratiometric fluorescent probe enabling endogenous FA imaging and mechanistic exploration of indirect oxidative damage due to FA in various living systems

    K. Dou, G. Chen, F. Yu, Y. Liu, L. Chen, Z. Cao, T. Chen, Y. Li and J. You, Chem. Sci., 2017, Advance Article , DOI: 10.1039/C7SC03719H

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