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Thermal dependence of nanofluidic energy conversion by reverse electrodialysis

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Abstract

The thermal dependence of salinity-gradient-driven energy conversion by reverse electrodialysis using a mesoporous silica thin film with pores ca. 2–3 nm in diameter was studied in a temperature range of 293–333 K. As the temperature increases, the surface charge density of mesopores increases owing to an increase in the zeta potential of the pore walls, which in turn increases the concentration of counter-ions in the electrical double layer. The ion mobility also increases with increasing temperature owing to a decrease in the liquid viscosity. As a result, the temperature increase improves the ion conductance of mesopores both in the surface-charge-governed regime at low ion concentrations and in the bulk regime at high ion concentrations. However, further increases in temperature induce bubble nucleation. In particular, in highly concentrated salt solutions, hydrophobic patches appear on the pore surfaces because of the salting-out effect and mask the surface charge. The weakened polarity in mesopores allows more co-ions to enter them, decreasing the potential difference across the film, resulting in a serious deterioration of the energy conversion efficiency. The thermal dependence of the performance characteristics of mesoporous-silica-based nanofluidic devices was also evaluated.

Graphical abstract: Thermal dependence of nanofluidic energy conversion by reverse electrodialysis

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Publication details

The article was received on 19 Jun 2017, accepted on 21 Jul 2017 and first published on 31 Jul 2017


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C7NR04387B
Citation: Nanoscale, 2017, Advance Article
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    Thermal dependence of nanofluidic energy conversion by reverse electrodialysis

    J. Hwang, T. Sekimoto, W. Hsu, S. Kataoka, A. Endo and H. Daiguji, Nanoscale, 2017, Advance Article , DOI: 10.1039/C7NR04387B

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