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Issue 10, 2017
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Future perspectives for formaldehyde: pathways for reductive synthesis and energy storage

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Abstract

Formaldehyde has been a key platform reagent in the chemical industry for many decades in a large number of bulk scale industrial processes. Thus, the annual global demand reached 30 megatons per year, and currently it is solely produced under oxidative, energy intensive conditions, using high-temperature approaches for the methanol oxidation. In recent years, new fields of application beyond the use of formaldehyde and its derivatives as i.e. a synthetic reagent or disinfectant have been suggested. For example dialkoxymethane could be envisioned as a direct fuel for combustion engines or aqueous formaldehyde and paraformaldehyde may act as a liquid organic hydrogen carrier molecule (LOHC) for hydrogen generation to be used for hydrogen fuel cells. To turn these new perspectives in feasible approaches, it requires also new less energy-intensive technologies for the synthesis of formaldehyde. This perspective article spreads light on the recent directions towards the low-temperature reductive synthesis of formaldehyde and its derivatives and low-temperature formaldehyde reforming for hydrogen generation. These aspects are important for the future demands on modern societies’ renewable energy management, in the form of a methanol and hydrogen economy, and the required formaldehyde-feedstock for the manufacture of many formaldehyde-based daily products.

Graphical abstract: Future perspectives for formaldehyde: pathways for reductive synthesis and energy storage

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Publication details

The article was received on 09 Nov 2016, accepted on 16 Dec 2016 and first published on 16 Dec 2016


Article type: Perspective
DOI: 10.1039/C6GC03093A
Citation: Green Chem., 2017,19, 2347-2355
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY-NC license
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    Future perspectives for formaldehyde: pathways for reductive synthesis and energy storage

    L. E. Heim, H. Konnerth and M. H. G. Prechtl, Green Chem., 2017, 19, 2347
    DOI: 10.1039/C6GC03093A

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