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Issue 2, 2017
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Transaminase biocatalysis: optimization and application

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Abstract

Transaminases (TAs) are one of the most promising biocatalysts in organic synthesis for the preparation of chiral amino compounds. The concise reaction, excellent enantioselectivity, environmental friendliness and compatibility with other enzymatic or chemical systems have brought TAs to the attention of scientists working in the area of biocatalysis. However, to utilize TAs in a more efficient and economical way, attempts have to be made to optimize their performance. The demand for various substrate specificities, stability under non-physiological conditions and higher conversions in reversible reactions have been targeted and investigated thoroughly. A number of both protein- and process-based strategies have been developed to improve TAs and systems involving TAs. Moreover, by combination with other enzymes in cascade reactions or even in more complex systems, so called synthetic biology and systems biocatalysis, TAs can be biocatalysts with immense potential in the industrial production of high-value chemical products. This review will highlight strategies for optimization of TAs and will discuss a number of elegant systems for improving their performance. Transaminase biocatalysis has been, and will continue to be, one of the most interesting topics in green organic synthesis.

Graphical abstract: Transaminase biocatalysis: optimization and application

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Publication details

The article was received on 20 Aug 2016, accepted on 30 Sep 2016 and first published on 30 Sep 2016


Article type: Critical Review
DOI: 10.1039/C6GC02328B
Citation: Green Chem., 2017,19, 333-360
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY license
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    Transaminase biocatalysis: optimization and application

    F. Guo and P. Berglund, Green Chem., 2017, 19, 333
    DOI: 10.1039/C6GC02328B

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