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Issue 10, 2017
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Diesel particulate matter and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fire stations

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Abstract

Firefighters are known to be exposed to a wide variety of combustion products during operational and training firefighting activities. However, the potential for exposure to diesel exhaust emissions, recently classified as carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, also exists within the fire station environment. In this study, concentrations of diesel particulate matter and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons have been measured in the engine bays, duty offices and dormitory areas of eight fire stations in Queensland, Australia. Operation of fire appliances and mechanical equipment during start of shift checks were found to contribute more strongly to overall engine bay diesel particulate matter concentrations than the number of fire appliance departures and returns. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were found to be transported further into fire station living environments than diesel particulate matter. This study highlights a number of potential strategies for reducing firefighter exposures to components of diesel engine exhaust in the fire station environment.

Graphical abstract: Diesel particulate matter and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fire stations

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Publication details

The article was received on 30 Jun 2017, accepted on 19 Aug 2017 and first published on 29 Aug 2017


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C7EM00291B
Citation: Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2017,19, 1320-1326
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    Diesel particulate matter and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fire stations

    R. C. Bott, Katherine M. Kirk, M. B. Logan and D. A. Reid, Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2017, 19, 1320
    DOI: 10.1039/C7EM00291B

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