Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 11, 2016
Previous Article Next Article

Atmospheric chemistry of bioaerosols: heterogeneous and multiphase reactions with atmospheric oxidants and other trace gases

Author affiliations

Abstract

Advances in analytical techniques and instrumentation have now established methods for detecting, quantifying, and identifying the chemical and microbial constituents of particulate matter in the atmosphere. For example, recent cryo-TEM studies of sea spray have identified whole bacteria and viruses ejected from ocean seawater into air. A focal point of this perspective is directed towards the reactivity of aerosol particles of biological origin with oxidants (OH, NO3, and O3) present in the atmosphere. Complementary information on the reactivity of aerosol particles is obtained from field investigations and laboratory studies. Laboratory studies of different types of biologically-derived particles offer important information related to their impacts on the local and global environment. These studies can also unravel a range of different chemistries and reactivity afforded by the complexity and diversity of the chemical make-up of these particles. Laboratory experiments as the ones reviewed herein can elucidate the chemistry of biological aerosols.

Graphical abstract: Atmospheric chemistry of bioaerosols: heterogeneous and multiphase reactions with atmospheric oxidants and other trace gases

Back to tab navigation

Publication details

The article was received on 27 May 2016, accepted on 17 Jul 2016 and first published on 28 Jul 2016


Article type: Minireview
DOI: 10.1039/C6SC02353C
Citation: Chem. Sci., 2016,7, 6604-6616
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY license
  •   Request permissions

    Atmospheric chemistry of bioaerosols: heterogeneous and multiphase reactions with atmospheric oxidants and other trace gases

    A. D. Estillore, J. V. Trueblood and V. H. Grassian, Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 6604
    DOI: 10.1039/C6SC02353C

    This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Licence. Material from this article can be used in other publications provided that the correct acknowledgement is given with the reproduced material.

    Reproduced material should be attributed as follows:

    • For reproduction of material from NJC:
      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and the RSC.
    • For reproduction of material from PCCP:
      [Original citation] - Published by the PCCP Owner Societies.
    • For reproduction of material from PPS:
      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the European Society for Photobiology, the European Photochemistry Association, and RSC.
    • For reproduction of material from all other RSC journals:
      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

    Information about reproducing material from RSC articles with different licences is available on our Permission Requests page.

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements