Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 12, 2016
Previous Article Next Article

A link between chromatin condensation mechanisms and Huntington's disease: connecting the dots

Author affiliations

Abstract

Huntington's disease is a rare neurodegenerative disorder whose complex pathophysiology exhibits system-wide changes in the body, with striking and debilitating clinical features targeting the central nervous system. Among the various molecular functions affected in this disease, mitochondrial dysfunction and transcriptional dysregulation are some of the most studied aspects of this disease. However, there is evidence of the involvement of a mutant Huntingtin protein in the processes of DNA damage, chromosome condensation and DNA repair. This review attempts to briefly recapitulate the clinical features, model systems used to study the disease, major molecular processes affected, and, more importantly, examines recent evidence for the involvement of the mutant Huntingtin protein in the processes regulating chromosome condensation, leading to DNA damage response and neuronal death.

Graphical abstract: A link between chromatin condensation mechanisms and Huntington's disease: connecting the dots

Back to tab navigation

Publication details

The article was received on 18 Aug 2016, accepted on 22 Sep 2016 and first published on 22 Sep 2016


Article type: Review Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6MB00598E
Citation: Mol. BioSyst., 2016,12, 3515-3529
  •   Request permissions

    A link between chromatin condensation mechanisms and Huntington's disease: connecting the dots

    S. Lokhande, B. N. Patra and A. Ray, Mol. BioSyst., 2016, 12, 3515
    DOI: 10.1039/C6MB00598E

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements