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Issue 12, 2016
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Droplet microfluidics for microbiology: techniques, applications and challenges

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Abstract

Droplet microfluidics has rapidly emerged as one of the key technologies opening up new experimental possibilities in microbiology. The ability to generate, manipulate and monitor droplets carrying single cells or small populations of bacteria in a highly parallel and high throughput manner creates new approaches for solving problems in diagnostics and for research on bacterial evolution. This review presents applications of droplet microfluidics in various fields of microbiology: i) detection and identification of pathogens, ii) antibiotic susceptibility testing, iii) studies of microbial physiology and iv) biotechnological selection and improvement of strains. We also list the challenges in the dynamically developing field and new potential uses of droplets in microbiology.

Graphical abstract: Droplet microfluidics for microbiology: techniques, applications and challenges

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Publication details

The article was received on 17 Mar 2016, accepted on 06 May 2016 and first published on 06 May 2016


Article type: Critical Review
DOI: 10.1039/C6LC00367B
Citation: Lab Chip, 2016,16, 2168-2187
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY-NC license
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    Droplet microfluidics for microbiology: techniques, applications and challenges

    T. S. Kaminski, O. Scheler and P. Garstecki, Lab Chip, 2016, 16, 2168
    DOI: 10.1039/C6LC00367B

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