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Issue 3, 2016
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Using photo-initiated polymerization reactions to detect molecular recognition

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Abstract

Widely used medical diagnostic devices and assays that sense the presence of a particular molecule in a bodily fluid often rely on either a nanoparticle label or an enzymatic reaction to generate a signal that is easily detectable. In many cases, it is desirable if the magnitude of the signal correlates with the concentration of the molecule of interest. Photo-initiated polymerization reactions are an alternative means of generating amplified signals that can be used to quantify biological molecules in complex fluids. In this case, the formation of a polymer, typically a cross-linked hydrogel, signifies the presence of the molecule of interest. This tutorial review explains how photo-initiated polymerization reactions have been used in a conditional manner to detect and quantify molecular recognition events. We weigh the advantages and disadvantages of using photo-initiated reactions in comparison with other approaches and highlight exciting directions and opportunities in this area.

Graphical abstract: Using photo-initiated polymerization reactions to detect molecular recognition

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Publication details

The article was received on 06 Mar 2015 and first published on 16 Dec 2015


Article type: Tutorial Review
DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00205B
Author version available: Download Author version (PDF)
Citation: Chem. Soc. Rev., 2016,45, 532-545
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    Using photo-initiated polymerization reactions to detect molecular recognition

    K. Kaastrup and H. D. Sikes, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2016, 45, 532
    DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00205B

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