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Issue 18, 2016
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DNA-based control of protein activity

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Abstract

DNA has emerged as a highly versatile construction material for nanometer-sized structures and sophisticated molecular machines and circuits. The successful application of nucleic acid based systems greatly relies on their ability to autonomously sense and act on their environment. In this feature article, the development of DNA-based strategies to dynamically control protein activity via oligonucleotide triggers is discussed. Depending on the desired application, protein activity can be controlled by directly conjugating them to an oligonucleotide handle, or expressing them as a fusion protein with DNA binding motifs. To control proteins without modifying them chemically or genetically, multivalent ligands and aptamers that reversibly inhibit their function provide valuable tools to regulate proteins in a noncovalent manner. The goal of this feature article is to give an overview of strategies developed to control protein activity via oligonucleotide-based triggers, as well as hurdles yet to be taken to obtain fully autonomous systems that interrogate, process and act on their environments by means of DNA-based protein control.

Graphical abstract: DNA-based control of protein activity

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Publication details

The article was received on 29 Nov 2015, accepted on 18 Jan 2016 and first published on 19 Jan 2016


Article type: Feature Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5CC09853J
Citation: Chem. Commun., 2016,52, 3598-3610
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY license
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    DNA-based control of protein activity

    W. Engelen, B. M. G. Janssen and M. Merkx, Chem. Commun., 2016, 52, 3598
    DOI: 10.1039/C5CC09853J

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      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

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