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Issue 42, 2016
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In vitro physiological performance factors of a catalase-based biosensor for real-time electrochemical detection of brain hydrogen peroxide in freely-moving animals

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Abstract

Physiological performance factors of a catalase-based paired microelectrochemical biosensor, developed for real-time neurochemical monitoring of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), were determined in the in vitro environment. The excellent ascorbic acid (AA) rejection characteristics and high sensitivity of the paired H2O2 sensor were assessed and verified. The highly suitable response time of the H2O2 sensor was demonstrated and the limit of detection of this sensor was calculated as ca. 0.075 μM. The H2O2 sensor was selective over the electroactive substance Mercaptosuccinate which is used in vivo to disrupt the enzymatic degradation of brain H2O2. The H2O2 sensing element of this paired design was impervious to an acidic/basic shift in environmental pH (6.5/8.0) relative to physiological levels (7.4). The influence of a temperature transition (ca. 23 °C to 37 °C) and a physiological temperature fluctuation expected to be found in vivo (1–4 °C), on the response of the paired H2O2 sensor was deemed negligible and consistent with other amperometric methods. The enzymatic component of the paired H2O2 sensor was found to be stable over a 14 day period of continuous ex vivo brain tissue exposure.

Graphical abstract: In vitro physiological performance factors of a catalase-based biosensor for real-time electrochemical detection of brain hydrogen peroxide in freely-moving animals

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Publication details

The article was received on 02 Aug 2016, accepted on 10 Oct 2016 and first published on 12 Oct 2016


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C6AY02190E
Citation: Anal. Methods, 2016,8, 7614-7622
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    In vitro physiological performance factors of a catalase-based biosensor for real-time electrochemical detection of brain hydrogen peroxide in freely-moving animals

    S. L. O'Riordan, K. Mc Laughlin and J. P. Lowry, Anal. Methods, 2016, 8, 7614
    DOI: 10.1039/C6AY02190E

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