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Issue 11, 2015
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Stabilization and fabrication of microbubbles: applications for medical purposes and functional materials

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Abstract

Microbubbles with diameters ranging from a few micrometers to tens of micrometers have garnered significant attention in various applications including food processing, water treatment, enhanced oil recovery, surface cleaning, medical purposes, and material preparation fields with versatile functionalities. A variety of techniques have been developed to prepare microbubbles, such as ultrasonication, excimer laser ablation, high shear emulsification, membrane emulsification, an inkjet printing method, electrohydrodynamic atomization, template layer-by-layer deposition, and microfluidics. Generated bubbles should be immediately stabilized via the adsorption of stabilizing materials (e.g., surfactants, lipids, proteins, and solid particles) onto the gas–liquid interface to lower the interfacial tension. Such adsorption of stabilizers prevents coalescence between the microbubbles and also suppresses gas dissolution and resulting disproportionation caused by the presence of the Laplace overpressure across the gas–liquid interface. Herein, we comprehensively review three important topics of microbubbles: stabilization, fabrication, and applications.

Graphical abstract: Stabilization and fabrication of microbubbles: applications for medical purposes and functional materials

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Publication details

The article was received on 15 Jan 2015, accepted on 11 Feb 2015 and first published on 11 Feb 2015


Article type: Review Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5SM00113G
Author version available: Download Author version (PDF)
Citation: Soft Matter, 2015,11, 2067-2079
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    Stabilization and fabrication of microbubbles: applications for medical purposes and functional materials

    M. Lee, E. Y. Lee, D. Lee and B. J. Park, Soft Matter, 2015, 11, 2067
    DOI: 10.1039/C5SM00113G

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