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Issue 13, 2015
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Liquid marbles: topical context within soft matter and recent progress

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Abstract

The study of particle stabilized interfaces has a long history in terms of emulsions, foams and related dry powders. The same underlying interfacial energy principles also allow hydrophobic particles to encapsulate individual droplets into a stable form as individual macroscopic objects, which have recently been called “Liquid Marbles”. Here we discuss conceptual similarities to superhydrophobic surfaces, capillary origami, slippery liquids-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS) and Leidenfrost droplets. We provide a review of recent progress on liquid marbles, since our earlier Emerging Area article (Soft Matter, 2011, 7, 5473–5481), and speculate on possible future directions from new liquid-infused liquid marbles to microarray applications. We highlight a range of properties of liquid marbles and describe applications including detecting changes in physical properties (e.g. pH, UV, NIR, temperature), use for gas sensing, synthesis of compounds/composites, blood typing and cell culture.

Graphical abstract: Liquid marbles: topical context within soft matter and recent progress

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Publication details

The article was received on 12 Jan 2015, accepted on 23 Feb 2015 and first published on 23 Feb 2015


Article type: Review Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5SM00084J
Citation: Soft Matter, 2015,11, 2530-2546
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY license
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    Liquid marbles: topical context within soft matter and recent progress

    G. McHale and M. I. Newton, Soft Matter, 2015, 11, 2530
    DOI: 10.1039/C5SM00084J

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