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Issue 18, 2016
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Heparin-stabilised iron oxide for MR applications: a relaxometric study

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Abstract

Superparamagnetic nanoparticles have strong potential in biomedicine and have seen application as clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, though their popularity has plummeted in recent years, due to low efficacy and safety concerns, including haemagglutination. Using an in situ procedure, we have prepared colloids of magnetite nanoparticles, exploiting the clinically approved anti-coagulant, heparin, as a templating stabiliser. These colloids, stable over several days, produce exceptionally strong MRI contrast capabilities particularly at low fields, as demonstrated by relaxometric investigations using nuclear magnetic resonance dispersion (NMRD) techniques and single field r1 and r2 relaxation measurements. This behaviour is due to interparticle interactions, enhanced by the templating effect of heparin, resulting in strong magnetic anisotropic behaviour which closely maps particle size. The nanocomposites have also reliably prevented protein-adsorption triggered thrombosis typical of non-stabilised nanoparticles, showing great potential for in vivo MRI diagnostics.

Graphical abstract: Heparin-stabilised iron oxide for MR applications: a relaxometric study

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Publication details

The article was received on 04 Apr 2016, accepted on 15 Apr 2016 and first published on 15 Apr 2016


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C6TB00832A
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Citation: J. Mater. Chem. B, 2016,4, 3065-3074
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    Heparin-stabilised iron oxide for MR applications: a relaxometric study

    L. Ternent, D. A. Mayoh, M. R. Lees and G. Davies, J. Mater. Chem. B, 2016, 4, 3065
    DOI: 10.1039/C6TB00832A

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