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Issue 9, 2015
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Renewable fuels from concentrated solar power: towards practical artificial photosynthesis

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Abstract

There is intense interest in the solar driven conversion of water to hydrogen as a means of achieving the sustainable generation of a practical fuel. It is widely considered that such “Artificial Photosynthesis” processes need to achieve an energy conversion efficiency exceeding 10% to have practical impact. Although some solar-driven fuel generating systems have reached efficiencies as high as 18%, they are often based on precious metal catalysts, or offer only limited stability. We describe here a system that utilises concentrated solar power, which is inexpensive to produce, and an electrolyser module based on Earth-abundant materials capable of operating under benign conditions. This system delivers the highest efficiency reported to date, in excess of 22%. The electrolyser functions in electrolytes with pH values ranging from neutral to alkaline, including river water, allowing implementation in a variety of geographic locations. Testing over multiple diurnal cycles confirmed the long-term stability of performance. We also describe an analysis of the efficiency in terms of the critical cell-matching parameters and thereby understand the key directions for further optimisation. This simple and adaptable system addresses key criteria for the large-scale deployment of an artificial photosynthesis device.

Graphical abstract: Renewable fuels from concentrated solar power: towards practical artificial photosynthesis

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Publication details

The article was received on 17 Jul 2015, accepted on 11 Aug 2015 and first published on 11 Aug 2015


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C5EE02214B
Citation: Energy Environ. Sci., 2015,8, 2791-2796
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    Renewable fuels from concentrated solar power: towards practical artificial photosynthesis

    S. A. Bonke, M. Wiechen, D. R. MacFarlane and L. Spiccia, Energy Environ. Sci., 2015, 8, 2791
    DOI: 10.1039/C5EE02214B

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