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Issue 2, 2013
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“In rust we trust”. Hematite – the prospective inorganic backbone for artificial photosynthesis

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Abstract

The search for affordable high performance electrode materials in photoelectrochemical hydrogen production by solar water splitting is an ongoing quest. Hematite is a photoanode material with an electronic band gap suitable for efficient absorption of visible light in a photoelectrochemical cell (PEC). Although its poor electronic structure makes hematite a controversial candidate for PEC, it remains promising because it is an earth abundant, chemically stable and low cost material – necessary prerequisites for PEC to become a competitive cost-efficient solar fuel economy. In addition to reviewing some recent PEC research on hematite and its relevant physical and chemical characteristics, we show how hematite obtained by a low cost synthesis can be refined by hydrothermal treatment and further functionalized by coating with phycocyanin, a light harvesting protein known for photosynthesis in blue-green algae.

Graphical abstract: “In rust we trust”. Hematite – the prospective inorganic backbone for artificial photosynthesis

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Publication details

The article was received on 01 Oct 2012, accepted on 04 Dec 2012 and first published on 04 Dec 2012


Article type: Perspective
DOI: 10.1039/C2EE23668K
Citation: Energy Environ. Sci., 2013,6, 407-425
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    “In rust we trust”. Hematite – the prospective inorganic backbone for artificial photosynthesis

    D. K. Bora, A. Braun and E. C. Constable, Energy Environ. Sci., 2013, 6, 407
    DOI: 10.1039/C2EE23668K

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